Person in Colorado tests positive for avian flu

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UPDATE: A person has now tested positive for avian flu in Colorado. The person had direct exposure to poultry and was involved in killing the chickens thought to have the virus.They reported fatigue, but that was the only symptom and they have now recovered. Despite the positive case, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention considers the risk to humans from avian flu to be low. Tonight, the person is being isolated and treated with an influenza antiviral drug. Officials say while it’s possible the human case is a result of surface contamination, it can’t be determined at this time. Health officials say people who have job-related or recreational exposures to infected birds are at higher risk of infection and should take appropriate precautions outlined in CDC guidance. Reported avian flu cases in Lancaster County: Six flocks in Lancaster County have tested positive for avian flu. The U.S. Department of Agriculture said 18,000 birds were killed.Pennsylvania Agriculture Secretary Russell Redding said this latest flock is slightly outside the original control zone.”It’s a slight deviation in that they’re all Lancaster County. One of the flocks is a little further south, so we moved that control zone and surveillance zone a little further south,” he said.The control zone was set up last week by the state department of agriculture. It’s the six miles around the first farm that tested positive in Lancaster County – the Kreider egg farm in East Donegal Township.Redding said he’s somewhat concerned because the virus is moving. His team is trying to figure out how it happened.Stopping the spread is a top priority.”We have to have a sense of what’s out there. The team is here, the labs are functioning 24/7. We had over 400 people last week involved in high path AI just to contain and suppress those early flocks, just to give a sense of scale,” Redding said.More than 3.8 million birds have been killed at the first five locations where avian flu was found. Report avian flu casesIf you suspect live poultry is infected, you are asked to report it to the Pennsylvania Bureau of Animal Health and Diagnostic Service at 717-772-2852.That number is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.Symptoms of avian flu in poultry include a lack of energy and appetite.While avian flu is deadly to birds, it’s still safe to eat chickens and eggs.

UPDATE: A person has now tested positive for avian flu in Colorado.

The person had direct exposure to poultry and was involved in killing the chickens thought to have the virus.

They reported fatigue, but that was the only symptom and they have now recovered.

Despite the positive case, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention considers the risk to humans from avian flu to be low.

Tonight, the person is being isolated and treated with an influenza antiviral drug.

Officials say while it’s possible the human case is a result of surface contamination, it can’t be determined at this time.

Health officials say people who have job-related or recreational exposures to infected birds are at higher risk of infection and should take appropriate precautions outlined in CDC guidance.

Reported avian flu cases in Lancaster County:

Six flocks in Lancaster County have tested positive for avian flu.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture said 18,000 birds were killed.

Pennsylvania Agriculture Secretary Russell Redding said this latest flock is slightly outside the original control zone.

“It’s a slight deviation in that they’re all Lancaster County. One of the flocks is a little further south, so we moved that control zone and surveillance zone a little further south,” he said.

The control zone was set up last week by the state department of agriculture. It’s the six miles around the first farm that tested positive in Lancaster County – the Kreider egg farm in East Donegal Township.

Redding said he’s somewhat concerned because the virus is moving. His team is trying to figure out how it happened.

Stopping the spread is a top priority.

“We have to have a sense of what’s out there. The team is here, the labs are functioning 24/7. We had over 400 people last week involved in high path AI just to contain and suppress those early flocks, just to give a sense of scale,” Redding said.

More than 3.8 million birds have been killed at the first five locations where avian flu was found.

Report avian flu cases

If you suspect live poultry is infected, you are asked to report it to the Pennsylvania Bureau of Animal Health and Diagnostic Service at 717-772-2852.

That number is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Symptoms of avian flu in poultry include a lack of energy and appetite.

While avian flu is deadly to birds, it’s still safe to eat chickens and eggs.

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